SDGs: Nigeria ranks highest in female genital mutilation -FG

WorldStage Newsonline– Eliminating the practice of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) in Nigeria is crucial to realizing many of the sustainable development goals (SDGs) 2030, Minister  of Women  Affairs, Ms Dame Tallen has said.

FGM involves partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. The practice is mostly carried out by traditional practitioners.

Speaking at the launch of the Movement For Good To End FGM in Nigeria organised by the Federal Ministry of Women Affairs in collaboration with UNICEF, Ms Tallen noted that the procedure of FGM has no health benefit for girls and women.

According to her, “Available statistics show that Nigeria has the highest number of cases of FGM in the world accounting for about 115 million out of 130 million circumcised women worldwide.  The South-South zone with 77% among adult women has the highest prevalence practice in Nigeria.  This is followed by the South East zone with 68% and South West zone with 65%.  The Northern part of Nigeria is also not free from this practice.”

She described “FGM as a traditional practice inflicted on girls and women worldwide and it is widely recognized as a violation of human rights, which is deeply rooted in cultural beliefs and perceptions over decades and generations.

“The resulting outcome of FGM are adverse pain and hemorrhage, infection, acute urinary retention following such trauma, damage to the urethra or anus.

“During the procedure, the victim would struggle through an experience which leads to chronic pelvic infection, dysmenorrhea, retention cysts, sexual difficulties, obstetric complications, bleeding, prolonged labour leading to fistula formation amongst others.  The mental and psychological agony attached with FGM is deemed the most serious complication because the problem does not manifest outwardly for help to be offered.

“The continuous practice of FGM denies girls and women the right to quality education, opportunities for decent work and their health particularly sexual and reproductive are threatened.”

The United Nation(UN) Resident, and Humanitarian Cordinator, Matthias Schmale said the prevalence of FGM amongst girls up to 14 years old is still on the rise.

Mr Schmale said 86 per cent of these children were mutilated before the age of Five, meaning FGM is greatest at early years of life.

“What this tells us is that the perpetrators of this harmful practice are devising ways to circumvent surveillance and diminish the gains recorded over the years towards the eradication of FGM in Nigeria, by targeting infants who neither knows nor understand the enormity or magnitude of the practice they are being subjected to,” he said.

He explained that the practice of FGM which is handed over from generation to generation and culturally justified is no longer acceptable.

He noted that this practice violates women’s and girls’ rights to life, health, and dignity as well as their bodily autonomy.

“The time to end FGM in Nigeria is now and the responsibility to do so lies with us all,” he said.

The French Ambassador to Nigeria, Emmanuelle Blatmann, said at least 200 women worldwide have undergone genital mutilation and more might be affected in the coming years.

Ms Blatmann said FGM contravenes the rights of every woman.

“Indeed to promote the elimination of this scourge, coordinated and systematic efforts involving everyone are needed,” she said.

Spread the love

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.